The 3 L's

Why ‘Meet-Ups’ Will Never Be My Thing

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This evening, with a rare moment of time of my hands, I decided to spend it well, strolling through Green Park, here in lovely London, reading Richard Branson’s Like a Virgin (which I highly recommend to anyone with a business.. or a future business.. or any job at all for that matter.. or no job at all.. so anyone, really!) I was happily minding my own business, absorbed in my book, and then quite possibly the only thing that could have dragged me out of my meditative read-and-walk state in that moment was the click of a shutter – or rather – the continuous click-click-click of about two hundred shutters.

I had stumbled across a Brooke Shaden ‘meet up’ group, here in London. For those of you who are unaware, Brooke Shaden is something of a Flickr celebrity, whose portfolio can be seen here. While her editing skills and her constant steam of ideas are both equally impressive, I must admit, I find her work too gloomy and ominous for my taste. I’m personally more of a lens-flare/light-and-airy style girl. Nevertheless, I can see why she has such a large fan following, and the figures certainly show just how popular she is: 382K likes on her Facebook page, 12.3K Twitter followers, each photo of her Flickr account is littered with hundreds of likes, favourites and comments. I guess it shouldn’t be surprising, then, that she can so easily convince a couple of hundred Londoners to gather in Green Park one cloudy evening for a ‘totally free’ meet up with ‘lots of hugs, models to photograph and the love of the craft’, with a single Facebook post as an invitation.

I lingered for a while, curious. I had my camera with me after all. Who doesn’t enjoy a spontaneous photo shoot, after all? What I saw, however, did not strike me as the polished, well organised workshops that I imagine when I see behind the scenes images from the various Facebook fan pages of the photographers I admire, complete with agency signed models, rails full of beautiful garments, and an amazing set that no one but the workshop-running photographer would ever otherwise be able to afford.

Instead, I can only describe the scene as being reminiscent of vultures picking at the same rotting corpse for hours on end. That is the big problem with meet ups and workshops – there is no privacy. In the short time that I lingered, watching from a park bench, I saw the same scene on loop: one photographer would tentatively approach one of the volunteer models, distinctive only from their wearing one of Brooke’s trademark vintage dresses. They would briefly discuss an idea, wander off to find a patch of grass to call a studio, and approximately five clicks of the shutter later, the vultures would flock.

Next thing you know, that one photographer’s idea has been photographed a thousand times by fifty other people from every possible angle. Those images will undoubtedly pop up on Flickr in a day or two – if some of them have not already – each edited with varying degrees of skill, yet all undoubtedly almost identical. Originality… obliterated.

That is why ‘creative meet ups’ will never be for me, she whose idea-sharing skills are fairly limited to my introvert evenings alone with my thoughts, or bouncing ideas around a room with a creative team of stylists, makeup artists, designers, etc etc etc. She who will tackle anyone who dares to photograph my idea over my shoulder. At meet ups, there is not idea bouncing, no collaboration. Instead it’s a silent, mutual agreement of, ‘whatever happens here, is ours for the taking’. One person will shout out instructions to the model, and everyone will begin to capture the same shot in a strange, almost zombie-like trance.

They’re not entirely negative experiences though; I can see the value of these meet ups to others; they can be a great place to network, make new friends, gain inspiration. Everyone looked to be having a wonderful time. But personally, I think it’s surely better to network over ‘portfolio sharing’ events rather than ‘photograph mimicking’ events’.

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Workaholic

Wuthering Heights

Quote of Inspiration

Model: Ieva

MUA/Hair: Emily

Styling: Emma Styles
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As much as I love travelling, I really adore the local beauty of the Peak District, especially at this time of year, when the heather is blossoming in a beautiful sea of purple, as far as the eye can see. The smell is wonderful, the view is wonderful, the bees are a nuisance if you’re as nervous around them as I, but it’s worth the worry.

Recently, I was fortunate enough to put together an editorial shoot for Prototype Magazine, with a self-chosen theme of Wuthering Heights; a favourite book of mine, which I had recently re-read. Prototype is a small, independently run magazine, and so I thought it best to work with a small, intimate team to match the overall feel of the publication. I myself acted as stylist, with the lovely Emily working as both our makeup artist and hair stylist. Our model was the gorgeous Ieva. It was a wonderful day of exploring Hathersage, in the Hope Valley, and the surrounding countryside, laughing, picking flowers, very nearly falling off cliffs in my case… it was worth it. The shoot ended in almost getting stranded in the middle of no where, and an hour sitting in the rain, but again, it was a great day.

My location was only somewhat inaccurate for a Wuthering Heights themed shoot; while Hathersage’s heather fields are not the moors surrounding the Bronte’s home village of Haworth, Hathersage village was visited by Charlotte Bronte, and is thought to have inspired her when creating and choosing locations for Jane Eyre, so really, I simply borrowed a location from one Bronte sister novel for another. Bonus fact… it’s also the alleged burial place of Little John – as in, Robin Hood and Little John. His gravestone (which is actually marked, ‘Little John’, lies in the local churchyard, and you can decide for yourself whether or not the legend is true).

You can see the final images in October’s issue of Prototype Magazine, available here.

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